HAPTICITY AND TIME PDF

Paula Ivan Hapticity and Time Juhani Pallasmaa Notes on fragile architecture Materials and surfaces have a richly complex language of their own that evolves and changes over time. In this major essay, Juhani Pallasmaa puts the case for haptic, sensuous architecture. Modern consciousness and sensory reality have gradually developed towards the unrivalled dominance of the sense of vision. This thought-provoking development has been observed and analyzed by a number of philosophers in recent years.

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Paula Ivan Hapticity and Time Juhani Pallasmaa Notes on fragile architecture Materials and surfaces have a richly complex language of their own that evolves and changes over time. In this major essay, Juhani Pallasmaa puts the case for haptic, sensuous architecture. Modern consciousness and sensory reality have gradually developed towards the unrivalled dominance of the sense of vision.

This thought-provoking development has been observed and analyzed by a number of philosophers in recent years. And I think we need to examine very critically the character of vision that predominates today in our world. As a consequence of the power of the eye over the other sensory realms, architecture has turned into an art form of instant visual image.

Instead of creating existential microcosms, embodied representations of the world, architecture projects retinal images for the purpose of immediate persuasion.

Flatness of surfaces and materials, uniformity of illumination, as well as the elimination of micro-climatic differences, further reinforce the tiresome and soporific uniformity of experience. All in all, the tendency of technological culture to standardize environmental conditions and make the environment entirely predictable is causing a serious sensory impoverishment.

Our buildings have lost their opacity and depth, sensory invitation and discovery, mystery and shadow. Multi-sensory experience: the significance of touch Every significant experience of architecture is multi-sensory; qualities of matter, space and scale are measured by the eye, ear, nose, skin, tongue, skeleton and muscle.

All the senses including vision, are extensions of the sense of touch: the senses are specializations of the skin, and all sensory experiences are related to tactility. Even the transparent cornea of the eye is overlain by a layer of modified skin [ Touch is the parent of our eyes, ears, nose, and mouth.

Even visual perceptions are united and integrated into the haptic continuity of the self; my body remembers who I am and where I am placed in the world.

In his view, the work of authentic art stimulates our ideated sensations of touch, and this stimulation is life-enhancing. The retinal-biased architecture of our time is clearly giving rise to a quest for a haptic architecture. Ashley Montagu sees a wider change taking place in Western consciousness: We in the Western world are beginning to discover our neglected senses.

The architecture of the eye detaches and controls, whereas haptic architecture engages and unites. Tactile sensibility replaces distancing visual imagery by enhanced materiality, nearness and intimacy. We are not usually aware that an unconscious element of touch is unavoidably concealed in vision; as we look, the eye touches, and before we even see an object we have already touched it.

Touch is the unconsciousness of vision, and this hidden tactile experience determines the sensuous quality of the perceived object, and mediates messages of invitation or rejection, courtesy or hostility. The language of beauty is essentially the language of timeless reality. In its quest for the perfectly articulated autonomous artefact, the main line of Modernist architecture has preferred materials and surfaces that seek the effect of flatness, immaterial abstractness and timelessness.

The Modernist surface is treated as an abstracted boundary of volume, and has a conceptual rather than a sensory essence.

These surfaces tend to remain mute, as shape and volume are given priority; form is vocal, whereas matter remains mute. The aspiration for geometric purity and reductive aesthetics further weakens the presence of matter, in the same way that a strong figure and Contour reading diminishes the interaction of colour in the art of painting; all real colourists in painting use a weak Gestalt in order to maximize colour interaction.

Abstraction and perfection transport us into the world of ideas, whereas matter, weathering and decay strengthen the experience of time, causa lity and reality. As a consequence of its formal ideals, the architecture of our time is usually creating settings for the eye which seem to originate in a single moment of time and evoke the experience of flattened temporality.

Vision places us in the present tense, whereas haptic experience evokes the experience of a temporal continuum. The inevitable processes of ageing, weathering and wear are not usually considered as conscious and positive elements in design; the architectural artefact exists in a timeless space, an artificial condition separated from the reality of time.

The ideals of perfection and completeness further detach the architectural object from the reality of time and the traces of use. Consequently, our buildings have become vulnerable to the effect of time, the revenge of time. Instead of offering positive qualities of vintage and authority, time and use attack our buildings destructively.

A particularly thought-provoking example of the human need to experience and read time through architecture is the tradition of designed and built ruins, a fashion that became a mania in eighteenth-century England and Germany.

The architecture of Sigurd Lewerentz, for instance, connects us with deep time; his works obtain their unique emotive power from images of matter which speak of opaque depth and mystery, dimness and shadow, metaphysical enigma and death.

The language of matter Materials and surfaces have a language of their own. Stone speaks of its distant geological origins, its durability and inherent symbolism of permanence; brick makes one think of earth and fire, gravity and the ageless traditions of construction; bronze evokes the extreme heat of its manufacture, the ancient processes of casting and the passage of time as measured in its patina. Wood speaks of its two existences and time scales; its first life as a growing tree and the second as a human artefact made by the caring hand of a carpenter or cabinetmaker.

These are all materials and surfaces that speak pleasurably of time. As a reaction to the loss of materiality and temporal experience, we again appear to becoming sensitive to messages of matter, as well as to scenes of erosion and decay.

Materiality, erosion and ruins have been favoured subject matters of contemporary art from Arte Povera and Gordon Matta-Clark to Anselm Kiefer and the films of Andrei Tarkovsky. These works directly address our skeletal and muscular system: they are communications from the muscles of the sculptor to those of the viewer.

Contemporary art and architecture are again recognizing the sensuality and eroticism of matter. The popularity of earth as a subject and medium of artistic expression is another example of this growing interest in images of matter.

The imagery of Mother Earth suggests that after the utopian journey towards autonomy, imma teriality, weightlessness and abstraction, art and architecture are moving back towards primordial female images of interiority, intimacy and belonging.

Collage and assemblage are favoured techniques of artistic representation in our time; these media enable an archaeological density and a non-linear narrative through the juxtaposition of fragmented images deriving from irreconcilable origins.

Collage invigorates the experience of tactility and time. Collage and film are the most characteristic art forms of our century, and have penetrated into all other forms of art, including architecture.

Matter evokes unconscious images and emotions, but modernity at large has been primarily concerned with form. Significantly, at the same time, he rejected the universalist ideal of modernity in favour of a regionalist, organic, historic and romantic aspiration.

In his episodic architecture, Aalto suppresses the dominance of a singular visual image. This is an architecture that is not dictated by a dominant conceptual idea right down to the last detail; it grows through separate architectural scenes, episodes, and detail elaborations. Instead of an overpowering intellectual concept, the whole is held together by the constancy of an emotional atmosphere, an architectural key, as it were. In the mid- s Erik Gunnar Asplund, Erik Bryggman and Alvar Aalto made remarkably parallel moves away from the Functionalist aesthetics of reduction towards a layered and multi-sensory architecture.

Aspiund described this change of ideals in a lecture: "The idea that only design, which is comprehended visually, can be art is a narrow conception.

The feeling of external control and visual effect is replaced by a heightened sense of interiority and tactile intimacy. Sensuous materiality and the sense of tradition evoke a benevolent experience of natural duration and temporal continuum.

Whereas the architecture of geometry attempts to build dams to halt the flow of time, haptic and multi- sensory architecture makes the experience of time healing and pleasurable. This architecture does not struggle against time, it concretizes the course of time and makes it acceptable. It seeks to accommodate rather than impress, evoke domesticity and comfort rather than admiration and awe.

The architecture of experiential events Whereas the usual design process proceeds from a guiding conceptual image down to the detail, this architecture develops from real experiential situations towards an architectural form. As drawings, in fact, these buildings might sometimes appear vague, fragmentary or incomplete, as the design aims solely at qualities arising in the lived experiential situation.

This is an architecture of sensory realism in opposition to conceptual idealism. Authentic architectural experiences derive from real or ideated bodily confrontations rather than visually observed entities.

Authentic architectural experiences have more the essence of a verb than a noun. The visual image of a door is not an architectural image, for instance, whereas entering and exiting through a door are architectural experiences.

Similarly, the window frame is not an architectural unit, whereas looking out through the window or daylight coming through it, are authentic architectural encounters. Fragile architecture Our culture aspires to power and domination and this quest characterizes Western architecture as well; architecture seeks a powerful image and impact.

Whereas the latter desires to impress through an outstanding singular image and consistent articulation of form, the architecture of weak image is contextual and responsive. It is concerned with real sensory interaction instead of idealized and conceptual manifestations.

This architecture grows and opens up, instead of the reverse process of closing down from the concept to the detail. The dominant trends of town planning have also been based on strong strategies and strong urban form, whereas the medieval townscape as well as the urban settings of traditional communities have grown on the bases of weak principles. Strong strategies are reinforced by the eye, the sense of distant control, whereas weak principles give rise to the haptic townscape of intimacy and participation.

A similar weak structure has also emerged in literature and cinema. The new French novel, nouveile roman, deliberately fragments the linear progression of the story and opens it up to alternative interpretations. The films of Michelangelo Antonioni and Andrel Tarkovsky, on the other hand, exemplify a weak cinematic narrative, [29] which is based on improvization, and creates a deliberate distance between the image and the narrative with the intention of weakening the logic of the story and thus creating an associative field of clustered images.

The power of weakness The idea of fragility suggests listening and dialogue. Perhaps, we should also conceive architecture through a listening eye.

Geometry and formal reduction serve the heroic and utopian line of architecture that rejects time, whereas materiality and fragile form evoke a sense of humility and duration. The strength of architectural impact derives from its unavoidable presence as the perpetual unconscious pre-understanding of our existential condition.

Erosion wipes away the layers of utility, rational logic and detail articulation, and pushes the structure into the realm of uselessness, nostalgia and melancholy.

The language of matter takes over from the visual and formal effect, and the structure attains a heightened intimacy. The arrogance of perfection is replaced by a humanizing vulnerabil ity. This is why artists, photographers, filmmakers and theatre directors tend to utilize images of eroded and abandoned architecture to evoke a subtle emotional atmosphere.

There is an after-echo of the original bourgeois music hall form, and this is rendered profound, even tragic, by the opening up of the layers of time on the walls.

The top skin which seals the imagination at a specific style or period has been scorched away, so the walls exist in an indeterminate time, part way between cultural definition and eschatological dissolution. But this is no dead ruin: Brook has not been afraid to bash the place around a little more, breaking holes, putting in doors [ The insertion of new functional and symbolic structures short-circuits the initial architectural logic and opens up the emotional and expressive range.

It is indeed thought-provoking, that architectural settings which layer contradictory ingredients project a special charm. Often the most enjoyable museum, office or residential space is that which is fitted into a recycled building.

The ecological approach also favours an adaptive image, parallel to the inherent weakness of ecologically adapted processes.

Here again, artists set an example for architects. The art of gardening is an art form which is inherently engaged with time, change and fragile image. On the other hand, the geometric garden exemplifies the attempt to domesticate nature into patterns of man-made geometry. It is evident that the tradition of landscape and garden architecture can provide inspiration for an architecture liberated from the constraints of geometric and strong Image.

The biological models, bin-mimicry, have already entered various fields of science, medicine and engineering. Why should they not be valid in architecture? It seems to me that the more subtle line of high-tech architecture is already heading in that direction.

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Hapticity and time: notes on fragile architecture.

JoJonris Therefore, according to this perspective, distinct elements of form and space in architectural perception may be processed and represented in highly specialized brain regions in a sensory modality-independent manner. Whereas currently the outcomes of hapticigy dialog and contamination between architecture and neuroscience are hardly predictable, we believe in the paramount importance of sharing knowledge among disciplines. Functional imaging of human crossmodal identification and object recognition. Received Jan 21; Accepted May Other authors supported an even tighter relationship between architectural design and embodied cognition, as well as architectural experience and bodily self-consciousness Mallgrave, ; Pasqualini et al. Your reading intentions are private to you and will not be shown to other users.

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HAPTICITY AND TIME PDF

Iulia Vicol Hapticity and Time Juhani Pallasmaa Notes on fragile architecture Materials and surfaces have a richly complex language of their own that evolves and changes over time. In this major essay, Juhani Pallasmaa puts the case for haptic, sensuous architecture. Modern consciousness and sensory reality have gradually developed towards the unrivalled dominance of the sense of vision. This thought-provoking development has been observed and analyzed by a number of philosophers in recent years. And I think we need to examine very critically the character of vision that predominates today in our world.

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Other authors supported an even tighter relationship between architectural design and embodied cognition, as well as architectural experience and bodily self-consciousness Timme, ; Pasqualini hapticihy al. Nonetheless, neuroscientists have recently referred to touch in a way that may take hapticity into account. In addition, the sense of touch relies more on specific properties, such as surface texture, than global ones, such as shape or localization in space e. Constructing and communicating equality: Misconceptions about the Golden Ratio. Similarly, the architect Sara Robinson recently reconsidered the privileged link between haptic sensations and emotion. Support Center Support Center. Moreover, architects rely almost solely on pictures and drawings in architectural magazines or happticity to establish their personal aesthetics and design method Wastiels et al.

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