CHASING THE MONSOON ALEXANDER FRATER PDF

The binding of my original copy is broken, with the pages - stained with sweat, tanning oil, seawater, sand and muck - secured between the covers by means of a large rubber band. Truly a brilliant and inspiring travelogue! We liked the look of the cover and because it is a Penguin book decided to give it a try. Half memoir, half travel diary, it is wonderfully paced. How wonderful to get a completely different view of rain.

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Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Alexander Frater, who has died aged 82, was a journalist and author who wrote for The Daily Telegraph in the s and went on to become a multiple winner of the Travel Writer of the Year title at the British Press Awards. For a decade as chief travel writer for The Observer, Frater stood head and shoulders above his counterparts in the British press. It was said that the British Press award was withdrawn as the judges grew tired of naming him as the inevitable winner.

His book Chasing the Monsoon, which has been continuously in print since it first appeared 30 years ago, is a classic in the canon of Anglo-Indian literature. Frater came by the name under which his readers knew him when he joined the Telegraph magazine in So overnight Russell became Alexander, or Alex. Frater owed his wanderlust to a colourful background. The family moved to Fiji, when Dr Frater was appointed professor at the medical school in the capital, Suva.

Frater, an Australian citizen, was sent to Melbourne, attending the Scotch College, where he was head boy, and the university there; later he went to Perugia and Durham universities, but graduated at none of them, an unusual feat of which he was proud.

He arrived in Britain with the great Aussie migration of the young and ambitious, who included Clive James later a colleague on The Observer , stopping off in Perugia, where he enrolled briefly to study Italian at the university; it was said to be a hotbed of pretty young Swedish women.

There he met Marlis Pfund Swiss, rather than Swedish and they were married in In the early years of their marriage, Marlis worked as an air hostess for Swissair.

Frater was popular at Durham, maintaining lifelong friendships forged there. He rowed for the university and was captain of his college swimming club. He left for a job on Punch, to which he had been contributing since his student days. He always wanted to write, and a job on a then prestigious magazine greatly outscored a degree especially one that involved Anglo-Saxon.

He also made television and radio documentaries, largely based on his writing. It was perhaps surprising that Frater, very much a writer, edited as much as he did. He was gentle, charming and modest, and was always surprised to be greeted by readers. His wife Marlis died in ; shortly afterwards Frater re-encountered Alice Tomic, an academic at the American University in Richmond-upon-Thames who he had met when he was at Durham. Their relationship lasted until his death, and he is survived by a daughter and son from his marriage.

Alexander Russell Frater, born January 3 , died January 1

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Chasing the Monsoon

When the rains finally come and break the intense summer heat and drought, there is an enormous sense of relief, relaxation and jubilation. After a fascinating conversation in London, which he describes in detail, experienced traveller, journalist and author Frater decides to pursue the Indian monsoon, from its onset in the very south of the country right through to Cherrapunji , reputed to be the wettest place on earth. Background The book was first published in and has subsequently gone through numerous reprints. Those who are familiar with India will notice where it is dated, such as how, in the days before mobile phones, the writer has to deal with the archaic and unreliable telephone system. But they will also be aware of just how little more traditional features of the country have changed, such as the bureaucracy and the importance of having friends in the right places. Frater is an inveterate traveller.

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‘Chasing the Monsoon’ by Alexander Frater

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Alexander Frater, who has died aged 82, was a journalist and author who wrote for The Daily Telegraph in the s and went on to become a multiple winner of the Travel Writer of the Year title at the British Press Awards. For a decade as chief travel writer for The Observer, Frater stood head and shoulders above his counterparts in the British press. It was said that the British Press award was withdrawn as the judges grew tired of naming him as the inevitable winner. His book Chasing the Monsoon, which has been continuously in print since it first appeared 30 years ago, is a classic in the canon of Anglo-Indian literature. Frater came by the name under which his readers knew him when he joined the Telegraph magazine in So overnight Russell became Alexander, or Alex. Frater owed his wanderlust to a colourful background.

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Chasing The Monsoon

Early life[ edit ] Frater was born in a small mission hospital in Port Vila in the middle of a monsoon. Having submitted pieces to Punch while still an undergraduate at Durham he was, against all expectations, eventually offered a staff job, which prompted him to once again leave university without graduating. Later he was informed by a fact-checker that such an island really existed in Tonga , which went on to form the basis for a book published many years later, Tales from the Torrid Zone. As a child his curiosity about India, and particularly its monsoon season, was sparked by his father - who often told stories about the country. He stayed at the Koryo Hotel , where he was one of only 20 guests despite the building having 45 floors.

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